From pollution detecting clothes to yoga pants that give you feedback, explore some of our favourite pieces

Every day there are more and more clothes released onto the market that use some form of tech or engineering in the garment. Here are some of our favourites:

The Conversation

Google x Levi Smart Jacket

This $350 jacket can connect to your phone via Bluetooth and can be controlled by an app. You can play music, get directions home, read your notifications to you and you can even programme it so it will only read aloud messages or alert of you of incoming calls about people you really care about. It has the ability to track your steps and the pressure on the threads in the jacket.

Levi’s®

Watch someone trying out the jacket here

Wearable Experiments.

Wearable Experiments have created a piece of wearable technology that allows football fans to feel the players heartbeats. This is meant to create a fourth dimension for viewers at home. This has already been implemented across America for the super bowl and also across Europe.

Recently, they have released yoga pants which connect to your phone. The yoga pants vibrate to pinpoint parts of the body to focus on and the app gives you feedback at the end of your yoga session.

Dezeen

And better still, it was created by a female – Billie Whitehouse

The Unseen

Bringing chemistry and fashion together, The Unseen was created by chemistry student Lauren Bowker. Lauren was studying fashion at university when she fell ill and changed courses to chemistry. Whilst she was studying chemistry, she created a jacket with a special ink that allowed wearers to see when they were being exposed to too much pollution.

When Lauren began was at university, she created a pollution-absorbent ink called PdCl2. This ink changes colour from yellow to black in dirty conditions then reverts back in the fresh air. This highlights the pollution we are exposed to every day.

Read more about how she developed the ink here.

The Unseen have previously created a shoulder bag that changes colour seasonally. The ink has contains a formula which can track UV light levels, humidity and heat.

Read more on Lauren’s journey here.

University of Washington

Scientists at the University of Washington have created a fabric that can store data, such as security passwords, passcodes, I.D. pins, so you don’t need to type in the pin each time. Instead, the future could soon be, just swiping your sleeve in front of the device you want to unlock, and it’s done. Unlike many other smart clothing items, this fabric only uses conductive thread.

Read more on the fabric here.

If you are interested in wearable technologies in the future, a good place to start could be here


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